Student Health Services

Image: Photos of SF State students

Flu 2013-2014

Get vaccinated

Cover cough

Stay away or isolate

Wash hands

Information About 2013 – 2014 Seasonal Influenza (Flu)

Flu Sick Policy & Sicknote Policy

Influenza Outbreaks - 2013-2014

Influenza Vaccine - 2013-2014

Quick Facts

Hand Washing and Cough Etiquette

Stay Home and Stay Away From Classes When Sick (Influenza Like Illnesses (ILI))

Get Ready, Be Prepared

Medical Care and Self Care

Self Care

Isolation

Symptoms or Signs Which May Indicate Severe Disease Associated With Influenza.

Groups at High Risk For Complications of Influenza Including Influenza.

Thermometers and How to Take Your Temperature.

Body Temperature & Fever

How to Take Your Oral Temperature

 

 

 

 

Flu Sick Policy & Sicknote Policy

If sick stay home or in dorm room

In response to the 2013 - 2014  Seasonal Flu Outbreak SF State SHS is following the CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education.

The CDC recommends that Universities do NOT require a doctor’s note to confirm illness or recovery and the SF State SHS will not be issuing doctor’s notes, sick notes or “excuses” for Influenza Like Illnesses (ILI).

This policy will decrease the spread of Influenza Like Illnesses (ILI) to students seeking treatment for other injuries or illnesses. If you are asked for a sick note please print out a copy of the SF State 2013 – 2014 Flu Sick Note memo for the employer or faculty member requesting the sick note.

 

Back to Top

 

 

2013 - 2014 Influenza Outbreaks

  • The CDC has reported widespread Influenza Outbreaks in most States.
  • There have been Influenza outbreaks in California and widespread outbreaks are expected in the near future.
  • Patients with the 2013 – 2014 Influenza have had symptoms of an influenza like illness disease (Fever 37.8C or 100 F, and a cough and / or sore throat) for about a week.
  • Most fit and healthy patients in the USA have recovered without the need for medical evaluation, treatment or specific antiviral medications.

 

Back to Top

 

 

2013 - 2014 Influenza Vaccine

The 2013-2014 flu vaccine contains two different strains that were not part of the 2011-12 flu vaccine.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Quick Facts

  • Influenza Like Illness (ILI) is defined as fever (temperature of 100°F [37.8°C] or greater) and a cough and/or a sore throat in the absence of a KNOWN cause other than influenza.
  • Influenza has an incubation period of 1 – 7 days.
  • Map of Current Influenza Activity in USA

 

Back to Top

 

 

Hand Washing and Cough Etiquette

Seasonal Influenza is spread by:

  • Hands
  • Coughing or sneezing
  • Contaminated surfaces or objects such as door handles

To help stop the spread of germs, clean your hands frequently (every half hour) and after coughing and sneezing.

  • Wash with soap and water.
  • Clean with alcohol-based hand cleaner (>60%).
  • Cover your mouth or nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not into your hands.
  • Put your used tissue in a waste basket.

Practice good health habits. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids and eat nutritious food.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Stay Home and Stay Away From Classes When Sick (Influenza Like Illnesses (ILI))

  • Stay home or in your dorm room.
  • People who are mildly sick do NOT need to see a healthcare provider or get tested for Influenza.
  • Do not go to college, classes or work.
  • Stay away from classes, labs, library, parties etc. and limit your interactions with other people (“self-isolation”), until at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever, or signs of a fever, without the use of fever-reducing medicines.
  • If you must go into the community (e.g. to seek medical care) wear a simple face (aka surgical or procedure) mask.

Stay away from others during this time period even if you are taking antiviral drugs

 

Back to Top

 

 

Get Ready, Be Prepared

  • Prepare for Home Care / Dorm Care
  • Buy a thermometer, stock up on hand sanitizers (>60% alcohol), cleaning materials, tissues, and over-th-counter medicines.
  • Establish a “flu buddy plan” so that you and your buddies can support one another if any of you becomes ill.
  • If you live in Housing check up with your floor or section Resident Assistant (RA), Community Assistant (CA) or the Residential Life about SF State Housing's comprehensive 2013 – 2014 Seasonal Influenza plan.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Medical Care and Self Care

If you are ill with fever and a cough:

Medical Care

  • People who are NOT at High Risk and DO NOT have symptoms of Severe Flu do NOT need to see a healthcare provider or get tested for Influenza.
  • Do not visit the Student Health Center or other medical facility to obtain a "sick note" - these are NOT required for Influenza or ILI absences.
  • Influenza Testing is expensive and is prioritized for the seriously ill and for hospitalized individuals with specific symptoms and signs.
  • Perform Self-Care

 

Back to Top

 

 

Self Care

  • Stay well hydrated - water, sports drinks, rehydration solutions.
  • Take Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Ibuprofen as recommended on packaging to ease aches and lower your temperature.
  • Monitor your temperature at least twice a day.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Isolation

Off Campus

  • Stay at home - Self Isolate at home.
  • People who are mildly sick do NOT need to see a healthcare provider or get tested for Influenza.
  • Do not go to college, classes or work.
  • If you must go into the community (e.g. to seek medical care) wear a simple face (aka surgical or procedure) mask
  • Perform Self-Care

 

Isolation in SF State Housing

  • Self Isolate in dorm room.
  • Stay in your dorm room and notify your floor or section Resident Assistant (RA), Community Assistant (CA) or the Residential Life .
  • Residential Life will co-ordinate the delivery of food to your dorm room.
  • Keep in contact with Residential Life, your buddies and your professors via e-mail, text messages and phone calls.
  • If you share a dorm room you should advise your roommates and wear a face (aka surgical or procedure) mask at all times when uninfected people are around you (within 6 feet).
  • SF Housing (Residential Life) will make simple (aka surgical or procedure) masks available for people who are sick.
  • SF Housing (Residential Life) will co-ordinate the delivery of meals to your dorm room.
  • People who are mildly sick do not need to see a healthcare provider or get tested for Influenza.
  • Influenza Testing is limited and is being prioritized for the seriously ill and for hospitalized individuals with specific symptoms and signs.
  • If you must go into the community (e.g. to seek medical care) wear a simple face (aka surgical or procedure) mask.
  • Do not visit the Student Health Center or other medical facility to obtain a "sick note" - these are NOT required for Influenza absences.
  • Stay well hydrated - water, sports drinks, rehydration solutions.
  • Take Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Ibuprofen as recommended on packaging to ease aches and lower your temperature.
  • Monitor your temperature at least twice a day.

 

Patients who have been exposed to Influenza or have symptoms of Influenza AND are at high risk for complications of influenza or who have symptoms or signs of Influenza that may indicate a more serious infection should immediately seek care from the SHS or other healthcare provider:

  •  If you have a Influenza Like Illnesses (ILI) and visit the Student Health Services you will immediately be given a simple face (aka surgical or procedure) mask to wear in order to help protect others.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Symptoms or Signs Which May Indicate Severe Disease Associated With Influenza.

Patients who have any of the following should promptly seek care from the SHS or other healthcare provide:-

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest.
  • Dehydration from vomiting and diarrhea
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Shaking chills
  • Are severely ill
  • Flu-like symptoms improve, but then return with fever and worse cough

 

Back to Top

 

 

Groups at High Risk For Complications of Influenza Including Influenza.

Patients who have been exposed to Influenza or have symptoms of Influenza AND are at high risk for complications of influenza or who have symptoms or signs of Influenza that may indicate a more serious infection should immediately seek care from the SHS or other healthcare provider:

Patients at high risk for complications of Influenza include those who:

  • Have chronic lung disease such as asthma, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, or cystic fibrosis.
  • Have heart disease.
  • Have chronic kidney disease.
  • Have diabetes or another chronic metabolic disorder.
  • Have any condition that can compromise the respiratory system.
  • Have severe anemia.
  • Have diseases including HIV infection or are on medicies eg. chronic steroid or cancer chemotherapy that depress immunity.
  • Pregnant
  • Persons 18 years or younger receiving chronic aspirin therapy.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Thermometers and How to Take Your Temperature.

Thermometers
There are many three main types of thermometers – digital thermometers, disposable thermometers and ear (tympanic) thermometers excluding the old fashioned glass thermometers which contain mercury.

Digital Thermometers have a display window and an on/off button at one end and a temperature sensor at the other end.
These thermometers are designed for oral (under tongue) use, underarm (armpit or axillary) use or rectal use.
Digital thermometers are available online and from most pharmacies.
Omron is one of the major digital thermometer manufacturers – please see instructions for use.

Disposable Thermometers are thin plastic strips with a matrix of colored dots (usually blue) each labeled with a specific temperature.
These thermometers are designed for oral (under tongue) use and underarm (armpit or axillary) use.
Tempa Dot Thermometers are one of the commonest disposable thermometers  – please see instructions for use.  

Ear (Tympanic) Thermometers are more expensive and are more difficult to self administer.

Old Fashioned Glass Thermometers containing mercury are NOT recommended.

 

Back to Top

 

 

Body Temperature & Fever

  • A normal temperature is 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) or 37 degrees Centigrade (°C).
  • An underarm (armpit or axillary) temperature is 0.5 - 1.0 °F (0.3 - 0.6°C) lower than an oral temperature.
  • An ear (tympanic) temperature reading is 0.5 - 1.0 °F (0.3 - 0.6°C) higher than an oral temperature.
  • A fever is a temperature of 100 °F ( 37.8°C).

 

Back to Top

 

 

How to Take Your Oral Temperature

  • Do not eat or drink anything hot or cold for 10 minutes before taking your oral temperature.
  • Place the thermometer under your tongue, just to one side of the mid line, and close your lips tightly around the thermometer.
  • Leave the thermometer in place for the length of time recommended by the manufacturer (usually 1 to 3 minutes).

 

Back to Top

 

 

Additional Resources

Map of Current Influenza Activity in USA

2013 – 2014 Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Information - Centers for Disease Control

2013 – 2014 Influenza (Flu) Information - San Francisco Department of Public Health

2013 – 2014 Influenza (Flu) - California Public Health Department

H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - Managing your Anxiety - American Psychological Association

International Travel Information - United States Department of State

Twitter - CDC Flu

Twitter - WHO News

Twitter - FluGov

Twitter - California Department of Public Health

CDC Mobile Website

You Tube - California Department of Public Health's Channel

 

Back to Top

SF State Home