Student Health Services

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Chickenpox (Varicella)

New Case of Chickenpox (Varicella) in Housing - 9/20/12

Chickenpox (Varicella) Alert - email Updated

Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine Availability

Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine

Chickenpox (Varicella) transmission and symptoms

Individuals at HIGH RISK of Developing Complications

Patients with Chickenpox Who Need Urgent Medical Attention

Chickenpox (Varicella) Treatment

Treatment of  Chickenpox (Varicella) Symptoms

Treatment with OTC Medications

Online Resources

Community Pharmacies

Public Health Department Clinics

Shingles (Herpes Zoster) and Shingles Vaccine

 

New case of Chickenpox in Housing - 9/20/12

A SF State student living in Campus Housing has been diagnosed with Chickenpox (varicella).  The student has been isolated off campus.  See information regarding Individuals at HIGH RISK of Developing Complications and Post Exposure Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccination information for healthy non-immune individuals.

 

Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine Availability

On Campus

Vaccine Availability for Students, Staff, and Faculty

Chickenpox (Varicella) vaccinations will be available for SFSU students on Friday, September 21.  

Cost of the vaccine is $115.00 per dose and will be charged to your SFSU Bursar account.

 

The Chickenpox (Varicella) vaccine is recommended for healthy non-immune individuals.  For complete immunity, two (2) doses are required and these must be at least 28 days between doses.  Please see chickenpox (varicella) Vaccine Information Sheet from the CDC. /shs/files/assets/PDF_Files/Immunizations/vis-varicella.pdf

 

The Chickenpox (Varicella) vaccine is also available at public health clinics and many community pharmacies including Walgreens and Safeway. For further information please see http://health.sfsu.edu/chickenpox-varicella

 

In the Community

http://health.sfsu.edu/additional-information-public-health-department-c...

 

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Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccine

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/Varicella/default.htm

Vaccine Information

 

Post Exposure Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccination

  • For non-immune individuals who have been exposed to chickenpox, Varicella vaccination may preventing infection if taken within 3-5 days of exposure.

 

Routine Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccination

  • Individuals who have not had Chickenpox (Varicella) and do not have any contraindications should receive 2 doses of Varicella Vaccine to prevent infection.
  • Two doses of the vaccine are about 98% effective at preventing chickenpox (Varicella).

 

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Chickenpox (Varicella) transmission and symptoms

  • Chickenpox (Varicella) is a very contagious infection caused by the Varicella zoster virus (VZV).
  • The incubation period is the time between exposure to any infected individual and the onset of symptoms.
  • For Chickenpox (Varicella) the incubation period is 10-21 days.
  • Chickenpox (Varicella) is spread by airborne transmission (small particles remain suspended in room air for prolonged periods), droplets (large drops spread 2-3 feet) and direct contact with the rash.
  • Infected individuals can transmit the disease for 1 – 2 days before they develop the characteristic rash.
  • Infected individuals are infectious until the last of the rash (skin lesions) has crusted over – usually 5-6 days after onset of rash.
  • The typical rash usually begins 1-2 days after developing a fever.
  • Other symptoms that often precede the rash include tiredness, and loss of appetite.
  • The typical rash begins as small itchy red bumps (papules) that grow into fluid-filled blisters (vesicles) that slowly become scabs (crusts).
  • The rash begins on the face and chest and spreads all over the body. A new set of papules develop each day for several days. After several days rash will show all three types of skin lesion – papules, vesicles and crusts.
  • If you develop these symptoms, PLEASE stay at home or in your dorm room so you don't expose others.
  • Call your primary care provider or urgent care facility to arrange for appropriate care without exposing others to the virus.
  • For those who live on-campus, remain in your room and call the Residential Life staff member on-duty right away.  University Park North and University Park South residents should call the Towers/STTC Community Desk.
  • Do not attend classes or communal spaces such as the dining hall.
  • For most healthy individuals the illness is mild and will resolve in about a week.

 

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Individuals at HIGH RISK of Developing Complications

  • Individuals who are pregnant or have chronic diseases which suppress the immune system or are on immunosuppressive medications such as high dose steroids are at risk for complications.
  • Non-immune high risk individuals who have been exposed to varicella should immediately contact their medical provider to receive appropriate preventative treatment.
  • Individuals at high risk for complications who develop symptoms shoud seek immediate treatment from their medical provider.
  • If you live in the Dorms please telephone Residential Life and advise them of your condition.

 

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Patients with Chickenpox Who Need Urgent Medical Attention

Patients who develop any of the following should seek urgent medical attention via the Student Health Service or Emergency Room. To minimize the risk of transmission to others, please phone and speak to a Nurse at SHS or an Emergency Room.  Tell them your diagnosis of chickenpox and they will advise you how to get appropriate care and/or treatment.

  • fever that lasts longer than 4 days
  • fever that rises above 102°F (38.9°C)
  • any areas of the rash or any part of the body becomes very red, warm, or tender, or begins leaking pus (thick, discolored fluid), as this may indicate a bacterial infection
  • extreme illness
  • difficult waking up or confusion
  • difficulty walking
  • stiff neck
  • frequent vomiting
  • difficulty breathing
  • severe cough

 

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Chickenpox (Varicella) Treatment

  • Patients at high risk of complications may be prescribed antiviral medications by their medical provider.

 

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Treatment of  Chickenpox (Varicella) Symptoms

  • Drink plenty of fluids and of rest.
  • Wear loose, comfortable clothing.
  • Over the Counter Medications (OTC)
    • Do NOT use aspirin or products containing aspirin.
    • Do NOT take if allergic to any of the ingredients
    • Use according  to packet insert.

 

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Treatment with OTC Medications

  • For fever, use non-aspirin medications, such as acetaminophen eg Tylenol, Panadol
  • For relief of itching
    • Take cool Colloidal oatmeal baths eg Aveeno® baths.
    • Apply Calamine lotion.
  • For itching you may use Diphenhydramine (Benadryl®) 25mg

 

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Online Resources

CDC Varicella (Chickenpox) Website - http://www.cdc.gov/chickenpox/index.html

 

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Community Pharmacies

Walgreens

http://www.walgreens.com/storelocator/find.jsp

Walgreens in San Francisco/Daly City

Diamond Heights, Ocean Ave, Westlake

Price:  $145.99/dose

Your own doctor’s office or clinic

At many local Pharmacies, such as Walgreens, Safeway, etc

Call your local pharmacy to confirm that they have Varicella in stock

 

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Public Health Department Clinics

 

San Francisco Dept of Public Health – Vaccination Clinic

Website: http://www.sfcdcp.org/aitc.html

Address: 101 Grove Street, Room 102, SF 94102

Telephone: (415) 554-2625

Opening Hours: Drop-in

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday: 9:00am - 3:30pm

Tuesday: 9:00am - 2:30pm

 

 

Additional Information on Public Health Department Clinic

 

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